Category: On The Bookshelf

“…and Heaven have mercy on us all – Presbyterians and Pagans alike – for we are all dreadfully cracked about the head and desperately in need of mending.”

–Herman Melville, Moby Dick

“Perfectionism is a mean, frozen form of idealism, while messes are the artist’s true friend. What people somehow (inadvertently, I’m sure) forgot to mention when we were children was that we need to make messes in order to find out who we are and why we are here. . .”

–Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

“[E]very career and calling has bad days, and you have to decide if you’re committed to this career and calling enough to endure those bad days.” -Ed Cyzewski, p. 66, “Write Without Crushing Your Soul”

What Love Can Do

I referenced the sermon What Love Can Do earlier this week in a post.   Besides being a sermon from CPC Oveido, which is in my podcast feed, the title caught my eye because it reminded me of a book by the same name.

What Love Can Do the book was brought to publication by a great deal of effort by my aunt Gayle Nolan.  She taught college for many years in New Orleans, and the manuscript was brought to her by one of her students.  It had been written by her father, Arthur Miller,  during the 15 minute breaks he had at work at the Cabildo.  Aunt Gayle had a copy of the original manuscript, which was providential — the original hand-written memoir was lost when Hurricane Katrina flooded Arthur Mitchell’s home in the lower ninth ward.  This book is a collection of stories passed down through his family, from capture by slavers in Africa, through years on a plantation in Louisiana, and then after emancipation.

We share our stories — to understand one another and to be understood.  This book is worth reading, to get a glimpse of what love really can do.

 

What Love Can Do

 

So Many Books

Years ago I remember Pastor Randy saying something along the lines of “buying a book is like buying myself time/permission to read it.”

That is true for me. . . Except sometimes buying the book is symbolic of wanting the permission/promise to read it, and the reality doesn’t always follow.

And, maybe you’ll laugh at this, but I’ve had a crisis of getting older this year. I realized the obvious, but it was a gut-wrenching realization. I don’t have enough time or years left to read what I really want to read, to read all the good books.

I don’t have the same emotional reaction to the infinite info on the internet. People already “curate” content online. I don’t have a problem with more “good” stuff online than I can get to.

But I do struggle with knowing I can’t read all the good books I want to read.

(Thoughts, after reading this book recommendation.)

Book Club

Book Club makes me happy. Hubby teases me by calling it wine club, but really? It’s about women from various walks of life getting together and talking about ideas outside of the day-to-day. 

This month we read “Serpent in Eden,” a true crime story about the murder of Sir Harry Oakes. The appeal? It is set in Nassau in the 40s and gives a great glimpse of the social / historical settin of things I see every day. 

Book club makes me a little bit happier. So does the wine. 

“It is surprising how seldom books on parenting talk about prayer. We instinctively believe that if we have the right biblical principles and apply them consistently, our kids will turn out right. But that didn’t work for God in the Garden of Eden. Perfect environment. Perfect relationships.

And still God’s two children went bad.
“Many parents, including myself, are initially confident we can change our child. We don’t surrender to our child’s will (which is good), but we try to dominate the child with our own (which is bad). Without realizing it, we become demanding….
“Until we become convinced we can’t change our child’s heart, we will not take prayer seriously….”
Paul E. Miller, A Praying Life

 

Look What Came in the Mail!

 

TulipGirl Joy of Relationship Homeschooling

The Joy of Relationship Homeschooling” by Karen Campbell!

For years I’ve gotten my mommy-encouragement from Karen, who blogs at Thatmom.Com. The “ThatMom” podcasts are great for when I’m doing dishes and folding clothes. I appreciate her emphasis on “one-anothering” in our families.

I have been reading through on my kindle… slowly… But wanted the paperback copy to lend out. Plus, some books are just better when holding them in your hands. I’ll have a review up. . . eventually.

(Ooooh! Looks like Anne received her copy, too!)